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washington, the first president, and then john adams and all the way around until it came to ronald reagan right next to george washington. and he and i talked about the drama that he experienced on the wheel right next to president washington. on that particular week, we had the confirmation hearings of judge bork for the supreme court of the united states, and september 17 when i traveled to philadelphia with the president, it was a thursday and i missed my opportunity to question judge bork. and i got that opportunity on saturday morning, and i was the only one there and had -- at least there were only a few people there and had an opportunity to question judge bork for an hour and a half. and ultimately, played a key role in the rejection of the nomination of judge bork who believed in original intent and had a very, very different view of the constitution. did not believe in due process of law. that was not part of the constitution, and he disagreed with the incorporation of the ten amendments through the due process clause to apply to the states. and that was a momentous supreme cour
on c-span. >> each year, the washington center brings thousands of students to washington d.c. to experience the workings of our government firsthand. this weekend, they will discuss politics, government, and their futures. sunday night at 8 on c-span. >> this week, a conversation with the new president of the national association of broadcasters, a former oregon senator gordon smith. se6 to 2008. our guest reporter is the washington bureau chief of broadcasting and cable magazine. i want to start with the supreme court decision this week. i will ask you what their ruling on campaign finance means to your members. >> i probably should admit i never voted for mccain fine gold, so i think it is a big decision for freedom of speech. oddly, you cannot get on tv or radio without paying for it. broadcasters have a lot of cost in production and content. the american people rely on their tv and radios. ultimately, i suspect there will be more political advertising, but i think the best part of the ruling was full disclosure. i think the more that is disclosed to the american people
partners in rebuilding the devastated country. >> tomorrow on "washington journal," a discussion on the obama administration's policy on jobs and the economy. also, a look at how poorly equipped haiti is for natural disasters with a new york born councilman. olin that, a special election in massachusetts to fill the late senator edward kennedy's see. -- senator kennedy's seat. >> this week on "the communicators," a discussion on establishing high-speed internet in the united states. our guest is larry cohen. this program was taped in december 2009. >> this week, the president of the communication workers of america, larry cohen. also, the senior editor with telecommunications reports. briefly give us a snapshot of the communication workers of america. >> 700,000 women and men at work in the communications field. it could be broadcasting or journalism. we also have several hundred thousand retired members to remain active in many ways. we are in every state, with 10,000 in canada, including the canadian broadcasting company. >> what companies do they work for? >> about 1000 differ
beckstrom is the ceo of icann. thank you for joining us. >> tomorrow on "washington journal," the international affairs professor looks at the obama' s next steps for dealing with iran. daniel erickson looks at u.s.- cuba relations. "washington journal," live at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> now available, c-span is book, abraham lincoln, great american historians on our 16th president. a great read for any history buff. from 56 scholars, journalists, and writers, from lincoln's early years to his life in the white house and his relevance today. in hardcover at your favorite bookseller and out in digital audio to listeno
eggerton who is the washington bureau chief of broadcasting and cable magazine. thanks to both of you for being here. >> guest: thank you. >> host: senator, i want to start not so much with telecommunications, but with the supreme court decision this week, and i'm going to ask can you what their ruling on campaign finance means for your members. >> guest: well, i probably should admit i never voted for mccain-feingold, so i actually think it's a good decision for freedom of speech. but ultimately you can't get on tv or radio without paying for it. broadcasters have lots of costs and production of content and, you know can, the american people rely on their tv and radios. ultimately, i suspect it means there'll be more political advertising, but i think that the best part of the ruling was full disclosure, and i think the more that's disclosed, the american people can make a judgment as to who is for whom and why. and an informed citizenry is the best, but i think it does help in terms of at a time when advertising is down, perhaps political advertising will go up. >> host: john and i
cable and telecommunications association gave a speech recently in washington in which he talked about first amendment rights of the pipe owners, that in pushing the stuff over the pipe there is a first amendment concern there. do you see that as a reasonable argument, or -- >> guest: i'm not familiar with that argument. where does he take that or she? >> host: when the fcc looking into net neutrality, that they are possibly going to impinge on first amendment rights of the pipe owners. not on the content owners or the delivery of the cable system over the sort of connected cable architecture, but specificically over the broadband isp. in their first amendment rights decide how to the deliver that content. >> guest: yeah. that would worry us. we would be more interested in, you know, our rights as creators or citizens to create content to make sure we can get that content over a public internet that isn't disadvantaged. that would, to me, be -- i mean, the families of our countrymen, they meant individuals, they didn't mean corporations. i think we're running into trouble with that in
were at 55 below. we're reporting this a very cold day in washington when it won a semi- degrees out. it was 55 below there. and they have a lot at challenges when it comes to broadband. really satellite is their only option to the harsh weather conditions it's very difficult to have an even undersea cable. it's a coastal town with the beautiful arctic ocean. so satellite for some cells and that gap. a want to make sure we don't forget about satellite because there are parts of america they get nothing else but that. and it has limitations that we need to look at what we can do to make that better for consumers who have died as their option as well. >> your comments actually echo some of the comments made by the white house made yesterday in comments to the fcc to the department of justice as well from the and tia in a letter word the administration basically said that areas more need for competition. you're talking a lot about about competition. but do you talk about what you see is a competitive mindscape today. if there's not enough, and your thoughts on wireless. that is sounding
this on a very cold day in washington, we're complaining when it's 20-some degrees, but it was very cold there. and they have a lot of challenges when it comes to broadband. really satellite is their only option due to the harsh weather condition. it's very difficult to make a landing there. it's a coastal town right on the beautiful arctic ocean. but so satellite for some fills in that gap. i want to the make sure we don't forget about satellite because there are parts of america that just get nothing else but that. and it has limitations, satellite technology does, but we need to look at what we can do to make that better for consumers who are, have that as their only option as well. >> host: your comments actually echo some comments made by the white house and the obama administration yesterday in comments filed to the fcc through the department of justice as well as from the ntia in a letter where the administration basically said that there is more need for competition, and you're talking about competition. i would love to hear you talk a little bit more as what you see as the competitive
. it is a very competitive marketplace, very chaotic. i try to get out into the world outside of washington d.c. as often as possible to speak with people who are trying to figure out how to pay for all this. consumers still want quality, scripted programming, and that costs a lot of money to produce. there are two ways to fund that, advertising and subscriptions. thus far the market has not figured out another way to find it. consumers continue to want that. nobody really knows how the story will end up. we are in the adolescence of video competition. adolescence can be an awkward time, whether the person is going to grow up to be an ugly duckling and are a beautiful swan. what we should do from a government policy perspective is allowed as much freedom as possible for them to experiment and make sure there is no anti- competitive content. >> we are almost out of time. two senators recently introduced legislation bringing more expertise to the fcc. do you support that? >> how could i be against that, especially since my home state senator is introducing the bill, senator warner? we need to m
the rules have changed. a personal view is, to many aspects of policy in washington d.c. historically have been driven by ideologically first, and then i will find the facts to suit me. this is one area where is particularly true. you have to start with the facts and the data. what i like about chairman genachowski's approach is, he once different ideas. we are a data-driven agency. we will start first with what are the facts. that has to be the right approach. let's try to figure out what really makes sense and what is actually necessary for the help of those markets. i would never want to prejudge them, because it has to come from what the facts on the ground show, and they could change in two or three years. >> one of my first articles was about the difficulty of changing fax 4 legal regimes. congress passes a law, and then the facts change. the court issues a ruling saying the internet is x, and then one of the statements involving the communications decency act was, users rarely come upon unwanted content by accident and the internet. that was probably true in 1997. i would love to kn
a speech in washington in which he talked about first amendment rights of the pipe owners and that in pushing the stuff over the pipe is a first amendment concern there. do you see that as a reasonabler with that. >> that when the fcc is looking at imposing net neutrality that they are possibly going to impinge on first amendment rights of the pipe owners, not all the content owners or on the delivery of the cable system over the sort of connected cable architecture, but specifically of the broadband isp in their first amendment rights decide how to deliver that content. >> guest: yeah, that would worry us. would be more interested in, you know, our rights as creators or citizens to create content and make sure we can get that content over the public internet that isn't disadvantaged. that would to me be founders were country, talk about first amendment, their talk about corporations. i think we will run into trouble with that in different ways and that will get us onto another subject. but we would say the first amendment is about coming you know, a million people create
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11